Killing Canarygrass

Killing Canarygrass

Uncategorized
With springtime in full swing in Southeast Alaska, our meadows and forest shrub-layers are greening up as new leaves sprout from twigs and blades of grass poke up from the ground. However, in certain places around Juneau, curious-looking patches of yellow stand out starkly within a sea of fresh green growth. These bright spots are infestations of reed canarygrass, an extremely aggressive invasive plant that is found throughout Juneau and elsewhere in the region. In late summer and early fall, canarygrass transfers energy from above-ground foliage to below-ground rhizomes. Come spring, this stored energy fuels the production of new stems and leaves which rise up through a dense mat of yellow thatch left behind the previous year. By early May, fresh green growth nearly obscures last year's thatch. Reed canarygrass…
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WANTED: Bohemian knotweed (Dead)

WANTED: Bohemian knotweed (Dead)

Community Watershed Stewardship, Resources, Restoration & Mitigation, Uncategorized
Most  people don’t worry much about invasive plants during the winter months. After doing battle with them all summer or watching them take over our yards and open spaces during the growing season, we relax as the last of them die back in the fall. As cold winter weather grips the landscape, we take comfort knowing these aggressive species are tucked away in frozen soil for several months. As someone who’s attention is drawn to every infestation they see while out and about during the summer, I’m certainly enjoying this invasive plant-free time of year. While invasive plants may be out of our sight right now, they definitely should not be out of our mind. Now is the time to make plans for defeating these unwanted invaders. In 2018 SAWC…
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Updates from TIWC!

Updates from TIWC!

Uncategorized
Taiya Inlet Watershed Council is starting up another year of Salmon in the Classroom at the Skagway School. We are excited to be partnering with the Skagway Traditional Council this year, bringing a cultural component to the program! We started out the year with an egg take from our local pink salmon in Pullen Creek. The eggs are now in their tank in the school’s hallway for the students to observe as they go through the life cycle. In the spring they will be released back into Pullen Creek to continue their journey! Our last lesson focused on the internal and external anatomy of salmon. We had an up close and hands on look of the various organs and body parts. Source: Taiya Inlet Watershed Council Blog
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SAWC is taking on invasive plants.

SAWC is taking on invasive plants.

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An invasive plant is defined as a plant species that is non-native (or alien) to an ecosystem and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. The annual cost of invasive plants to the U.S. economy is estimated at $120 billion per year. Despite its remote setting, Southeast Alaska is not immune to invasion by these plants nor the economic and ecological impacts that come with them. In fact, well over 50 invasive plant species in more than 1,000 infestations have been documented in Juneau alone.   Reed canarygrass takes over a stand of fireweed near lower Jordan Creek in Juneau. SAWC is taking on two of the most invasive of these plant species – Bohemian knotweed and reed canarygrass. Knotweed…
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Stream and Wetland Temperature Monitoring Training

Stream and Wetland Temperature Monitoring Training

Uncategorized, Watershed Science
We are excited to partner with Chilkat Indian Village and Cook Inletkeeper to provide a stream and wetland temperature monitoring training and climate change monitoring training May 2-5, 2017, in Klukwan, AK. The training is designed for tribes and community organizations and will include hands-on field demonstrations. Contact information and more details, including a travel scholarship application, can be found here.
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Proposed Trail Project

Proposed Trail Project

Uncategorized
We're proposing a half mile overlook trail on the Jones Point Property and we want your feedback on the project. Please contact TWC at 907-766-3542 if you have any question/comments about this project. Source: Takshanuk Watershed Council Blog
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Now Hiring: Environmental Science Intern for Water Quality Monitoring

Now Hiring: Environmental Science Intern for Water Quality Monitoring

Uncategorized
In partnership with the Juneau Watershed Partnership (JWP), the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition seeks an Environmental Science Intern to carry out the collection of water quality monitoring data on the Duck Creek Watershed in Juneau: The JWP in partnership with the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition (SAWC) and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) will collect data to determine the effectiveness of the Nancy Street wetland in improving water quality conditions on Duck Creek. Since 1994, Duck Creek was listed on the state’s Impaired Waters List for non-attainment of dissolved oxygen (DO), residues/debris, metals (specifically iron), fecal coliform bacteria, and turbidity standards. The Nancy Street wetland is one of many restoration projects completed on Duck Creek to improve water quality, but there has been little to no water quality monitoring to…
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Goodbye from Rachel

Goodbye from Rachel

Uncategorized
Dear Community of Skagway, I’ve had the pleasure of serving you as the director of the Taiya Inlet Watershed Council for the past 4.5 years. Together we’ve protected riparian areas, built rain gardens, raised salmon from eggs to fry (and released them!), planned the Pullen Creek StreamWalk, held four Pat Moore Memorial Game Fish Derbies, written a Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual, and pulled a lot of invasive plants. My time here in that capacity is almost over, and I’m passing on my position. The Taiya Inlet Watershed Council (TIWC) now sits within the Skagway Traditional Council (STC). My hope is that together TIWC and STC can bring funding and projects to address the community’s environmental concerns and continue to work towards healthy salmon habitat in the Taiya and Skagway…
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