It may look good from afar, but it’s far from good.

It may look good from afar, but it’s far from good.

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It may look good from afar, but it's far from good. Unknown from Juneau until about 8 years ago, the European bird cherry is a highly invasive non-native tree found throughout the road system. While the tree was likely brought to town for its ornamental qualities, its acrid cherries are consumed by birds, which distribute the seeds to new locations in their droppings. SAWC has been busy mapping the distribution of bird cherry this spring as their leaves emerge long before those of other trees making them easy to spot in a crowded forest or back yard.  Next, we'll work with landowners to eradicate the trees. To learn more about this invasive tree, check out the full brochure and let us know if you find any around Juneau or other…
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Annual Spring Clean Up May 1st, 2021

Annual Spring Clean Up May 1st, 2021

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Help Keep Juneau's Watersheds Free of Litter Litter in our streams, riparian areas and wetlands isn't just unsightly, it can harm the environment. Plastic, the most ubiquitous type of litter, is common in many of our local water bodies and has a good chance of making it to the ocean, contributing to the 8 million tons of plastic waste that flows from land to sea each year. There, sunlight and physical forces break plastic into tiny particles. This microplastic can harm aquatic life and often ends up in the seafood that we consume. Help tackle Juneau's plastic pollution problem on Saturday May 1 by taking part in the annual city wide clean-up.
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SAWC Presents: Making Watershed Plans Work

SAWC Presents: Making Watershed Plans Work

Events, Trainings & Opportunities
Join the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition March 15th-18th for a series of trainings discussing how to get restoration projects off the ground. Speakers will provide locally relevant information and examples for Southeast Alaska communities involved in watershed work. Contact Sarah at SARAHMAEDAVIDSON@GMAIL.COM for more information.   ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED REGISTER NOW!   [gview file="https://www.alaskawatershedcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Making-Watershed-Plans-Work-Training-Series-Flyer.pdf"]
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Food Catalyst Fellowship – Apply now!

Food Catalyst Fellowship – Apply now!

Community Food Sustainability, Events, Trainings & Opportunities
The Sustainable Southeast Partnership, Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition(SAWC), and Spruce Root are thrilled to launch a six month-long fellowship designed to bring together Southeast Alaskans who are interested in catalyzing projects to promote food security and food sovereignty in rural Alaska Native communities. A cohort of up to six fellows will receive training in business and project planning, form connections with regional experts, and will be eligible to receive up to $15,000 in funding to support their projects. Click here for more details.
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Training: Stream Restoration Using Hand Tools Techniques

Training: Stream Restoration Using Hand Tools Techniques

Events, Trainings & Opportunities
With the support of the National Forest Foundation and the technical expertise of the US Forest Service, SAWC is sponsoring a training on the use of hand tools and work crews to restore in-stream fish habitat in streams that lack large woody debris because of riparian logging. The Hoonah Native Forest Partnership will be sending some experienced crew members to help share lessons learned. Students will learn to identify appropriate sites, how to plan restoration, and how to safely implement restoration by felling or tipping trees using winches and chainsaws and then manipulating the trees into place using winches and hand tools. The training is for crew leaders or biologist planning the restoration work. We are reserving the limited space in the training for organizations that are actively planning work crews within…
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Klawock Lake Sockeye Salmon Action Plan

Klawock Lake Sockeye Salmon Action Plan

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Sockeye salmon from Klawock Lake have been important to the livelihood and culture of the people of Klawock, Craig, and Prince of Wales Island for millennia. Over the last two decades there have been significant declines in the number of fish returning to the Klawock Watershed, and a group of tribal, native corporation, government, non-profit, and private sector partners are working to reverse this decline. With support from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and with facilitation and coordination from Kai Environmental, this group of stakeholders and community members has produced the Klawock Lake Sockeye Salmon Action Plan. The purpose of the Klawock Lake Sockeye Salmon Action Plan is to help guide landowners, stakeholders and the Klawock community in promoting healthy and sustainable sockeye salmon populations in Klawock Lake for…
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Restoration Potential in the Mendenhall Wetlands

Restoration Potential in the Mendenhall Wetlands

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The Mendenhall Wetlands, extensive intertidal and estuarine wetlands between the Juneau mainland and Douglas Island, are a globally recognized Important Bird Area, an ecological hotspot in Southeast Alaska, and a treasured recreation area for Juneau.  These wetlands have been heavily impacted by urbanization and resource development over the years, leading to habitat degradation and fragmentation. The Watershed Coalition recently completed a restoration opportunity assessment for the area to identify sites that have been altered or degraded but have the potential to be restored. We identified projects on several city, state, and private properties, and are already exploring some of these opportunities with the land owners and managers. We anticipate that this US Fish and Wildlife Service-funded assessment will lead to multiple wetland habitat restoration projects that reconnect and rehabilitate habitat…
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Before and After Restoration at Pat Creek

Before and After Restoration at Pat Creek

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Restoration of salmon habitat at Pat Creek near Wrangell is underway.  SAWC and our partners are adding large woody debris to about 1 km of stream. Fish like trees (when they fall in they create pools and other preferred habitats). The lack of mature trees along (and also in) the creek has resulted in less than optimal fish habitat including overwidened areas lacking pools and cover. Here is a before and after shot from the same spot on Pat Creek that shows the addition of large wood. Before                                                                           After  
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