Fieldnotes Blog

NEW! Implementation Plan for the SEAK Freshwater Temperature Monitoring Network

NEW! Implementation Plan for the SEAK Freshwater Temperature Monitoring Network

Community Watershed Stewardship, Watershed Science
We are excited to release the Southeast Alaska Freshwater Temperature Monitoring Network Implementation Plan! The Implementation Plan explains why the network is important, reviews existing monitoring sites, lays out a sampling plan for the future, and outlines short- and long-term goals for the network.  The strategic sampling plan addresses the need for long-term data, monitoring of culturally important sites, and filling in gaps in the types of systems that are monitored so that we can have a more robust understanding of stream temperature patterns and trends, and their drivers. Organizations that are monitoring stream temperature can learn more about the network on our website and sign onto the network via a Memorandum of Understanding, which can be found in the Implementation Plan. A big thanks to the Network Steering Committee and…
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Wrangell Area Watersheds Assessment

Wrangell Area Watersheds Assessment

Community Watershed Stewardship, Resources, Restoration & Mitigation, Watershed Science
As the community of Wrangell continues to grow and develop, the City and Borough of Wrangell and its residents have sought to identify and prioritize local aquatic resources to better plan for future land development and strategize potential restoration-based mitigation opportunities. In an effort to support the informed management of Wrangell’s watersheds and aquatic resources, the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition (SAWC) has undertaken the Wrangell Area Watersheds Assessment. The purpose of the Wrangell Area Watersheds Assessment was to compile a dataset and report outlining key aquatic resources within the City and Borough of Wrangell, including an assessment of the current habitat condition of key aquatic resources, identification of sites that could benefit from restoration treatment, and outlining watershed management challenges and opportunities. The community of Wrangell and its surrounding area…
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Litter Free Spring Clean-up April 20

Litter Free Spring Clean-up April 20

Community Watershed Stewardship, Events, Trainings & Opportunities
Litter Free, Inc. wants you! We need your help to keep our mission going of keeping Juneau, Alaska "Litter Free!" The annual community-wide spring clean-up of public lands, roadways, sidewalks, beaches, wetlands, and trails will be held on Saturday, April 20, 2019.  Trash bag distribution sites are stationed around the community and anyone can join us in picking up trash. Local contractors volunteer their time and trucks to take the collected waste to the landfill. Last year we hauled over 30,000 pounds of trash to the landfill.  We partner with many local businesses and community groups in this effort - be part of our team! Throughout the spring, summer and fall, Litter Free coordinates a "Youth Litter Patrol."  Thanks to our major program sponsors, Alaskans for Litter Prevention and Recycling (ALPAR),…
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Feb 20: Ocean Acidification and AK – Talk and Q&A

Feb 20: Ocean Acidification and AK – Talk and Q&A

Events, Trainings & Opportunities, Uncategorized
Please join us on Feb 20, 5:00 PM, at Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall to learn about and discuss the effects of ocean acidification in Alaska. The event will include short presentations from ocean acidification researchers Jessica Cross and Bob Foy of NOAA, followed by Q&A/dialogue with the audience. This is a chance for people to ask question about what we know so far about ocean acidification in Alaska and what we might expect in the future.  It's also a chance for researchers to hear thoughts and information needs from the local community.    
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Winter sampling in Fish Creek Estuary

Winter sampling in Fish Creek Estuary

Community Watershed Stewardship, Watershed Science
SAWC staff, joined by ADF&G Habitat Biologists, visited the dredge ponds in Fish Creek estuary, near Douglas, AK, to assess watershed enhancement opportunities in the area. To learn more about current habitat conditions, we measured water quality and trapped overwintering fish in both ponds. The east pond was completely iced over, but dissolved oxygen concentrations were high, and many stickleback and even a few juvenile Coho appeared in the fish traps. In the west pond, which is connected to Fish Creek and tidally influenced, we found many juvenile Coho, stickleback, sculpin, and even a shrimp in the fish traps. Water quality measurements indicated high dissolved oxygen concentrations and a mix of freshwater and salty, tidal water in the west pond. [caption id="attachment_7064" align="aligncenter" width="458"] Rebecca Bellmore, Jesse Lindgren, and Rob…
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New Release: Jordan Creek Watershed Management Plan and Riparian Assessment

New Release: Jordan Creek Watershed Management Plan and Riparian Assessment

Community Watershed Stewardship, Resources
The Juneau Watershed Partnership recently released an updated Jordan Creek Watershed Management Plan and Jordan Creek Riparian Assessment. Jordan Creek flows through Juneau’s Mendenhall Valley, through neighborhoods and heavily developed industrial areas. The stream is home to Coho, Chum, and Pink salmon, but erosion, stormwater runoff, debris (litter), and development in riparian areas are damaging water quality and habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms. SAWC will engage with landowners and the city of Juneau to pursue actions recommended in the Management Plan, including vegetating riparian buffers, exploring stormwater management options, controlling invasive riparian plants, and promoting litter cleanups and continuing to monitor the stream.
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New stream temperature monitoring sites added in Southeast Alaska

New stream temperature monitoring sites added in Southeast Alaska

Community Watershed Stewardship, Watershed Science
Stream temperatures affect the growth, health, and behavior of fish, and as the climate and hydrology of southeast Alaska change, stream temperatures will, too. A network of organizations across the region is monitoring stream temperature to establish baseline conditions and document changes over time. This summer, SAWC and several new organizations, including the Skagway Traditional Council, Wrangell Cooperative Association, and Ketchikan Indian Community established new monitoring locations, and will be contributing data to the regional network. [caption id="attachment_7006" align="aligncenter" width="3600"] Current sites with continuous stream temperature monitoring.[/caption]
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Nancy St. Wetlands Effectiveness Monitoring Final Report

Nancy St. Wetlands Effectiveness Monitoring Final Report

Community Watershed Stewardship
The Juneau Watershed Partnership assessed the effectiveness of the constructed Nancy Street Wetland by monitoring water quality above, within, and below the wetland. The final report, which incorporates data from before wetland construction, during the few years following construction, and in 2017, 11 years following construction, can be found here. This project was conducted in partnership with the University of Alaska Southeast and the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition. More information about the Nancy St. Wetland project can be found on the JWP website.
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Killing Canarygrass

Killing Canarygrass

Uncategorized
With springtime in full swing in Southeast Alaska, our meadows and forest shrub-layers are greening up as new leaves sprout from twigs and blades of grass poke up from the ground. However, in certain places around Juneau, curious-looking patches of yellow stand out starkly within a sea of fresh green growth. These bright spots are infestations of reed canarygrass, an extremely aggressive invasive plant that is found throughout Juneau and elsewhere in the region. In late summer and early fall, canarygrass transfers energy from above-ground foliage to below-ground rhizomes. Come spring, this stored energy fuels the production of new stems and leaves which rise up through a dense mat of yellow thatch left behind the previous year. By early May, fresh green growth nearly obscures last year's thatch. Reed canarygrass…
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